SIO63: Dangers of Neoliberalism with Michael A. Wood Jr.

Joining me for some lively debate about the harms of neoliberalism is Michael A. Wood Jr. Michael ended his service in the USMC in 1998, and joined the Baltimore Police Department where he served as a narcotics detective until retiring as a patrol Sergeant medically in 2014. In 2015 Michael turned to twitter to reveal the culture of law enforcement and authored several essays and books on reforms. Interest went wild. In 2016 Michael led a veterans group to Standing Rock where they protested the pipeline. Michael has since also focused on civilian led policing as a national grassroots form of action. He is currently a PHD candidate and a criminal and social justice activist.

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13 Comments on "SIO63: Dangers of Neoliberalism with Michael A. Wood Jr."

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Ernst K
Guest
I think Michael has too much confidence in his analysis of “the system”. He concludes that the system can’t be changed/fixed by working within it but he can’t possibly know this is true. And even if he is correct on that point, he can’t know that a better system will actually arise from the ashes of this one. At the same time he has such confidence that a better system can be built from scratch, he has zero confidence that the system can be fixed internally. To me this is the hallmark of ideological thinking. To me, you need people… Read more »
St. Ralfph
Guest

I applaud Mr. Wood’s work with Civilian-Led Policing and Vets, but for the first hour he was making a meta argument that Thomas just didn’t get. When all is said and done, I think I like the deck chairs better the way you had them before.

kyle
Guest
When the episode started, I felt like I generally agreed with a lot of Woods’s broader points, but struggled to connect with his arguments. As the episode continued, I feel like at least one of us was losing the plot. I’m not sure how much of the latter points are worth engaging beyond what was said in the episode, but I had a few thoughts. 1. I don’t find the arguments about Bill Maher’s joke “proving” he harbors some kind of hidden racism to be that compelling. In contrast, I do think there’s a lot of validity to the critique… Read more »
St. Ralph
Guest

I applaud Mr. Wood’s work with Civilian-Led Policing and Vets, but for the first hour he was making a meta argument that Thomas just didn’t get. When all is said and done, I think I like the deck chairs better the way you had them before.

Souperman
Guest

It’s nice that there is a white SJW out there to set us all straight as to which black guys are worthy to have a valid view on another white guy’s insensitive racial remarks. And then he disregards the opinions of the only black female on the panel. Why are all their comments rejected? Because apparently, black people can’t make money without being corrupted. I can’t figure out if Wood is a racist, a misogynist, a classist, or all the above.

Kit Hadley-Day
Guest
I could only get about half way through this episode before giving up, Wood’s repeated insistence that Obama was bad because he should have just changed sweeping aspects of policy by dictat was juvenile at best and delusional at worst. He would appear to be just like all those anarchists out there who think that the whole world burning is better than having to live within a system he disproves of, most people realize that the reason you change within a system is because violent uprising is not good for anyone. I am sorry but the suggestions that things would… Read more »
Oscar
Guest
Listened on a plane so I made notes and forgot to drop them; Great episode Thomas. A tad frustrating but a really good guest. I feel like his time spent deep in activism has radicalised his political views a bit too far past pragmatic, practical reality. I used to think I lived in a very progressive nook of Australian subculture. But come the campaign and my friends start spouting the “but hillarys going to start ww3” bullshit equivocation fucking RUSSIAN PROPAGANDA. Seems like this guy really has absorbed that belief, which shows an appalling lack of self reflection, after criticising… Read more »
Listener
Guest

That was really interesting. It sounds like neo-liberalism is pretty analogous to White Feminism. Better than nothing, but still not very good.

I especially liked Michael advocating for local change first. A third candidate can’t get anywhere nationally, but if a new party starts to spring up in many locations it has a chance to grow in to a national one.

Skeptiqueer
Guest

It would be great to have Andrew and Michael on a three-way to discuss what powers a president does and doesn’t have RE: rescheduling marijuana and forcing state and local police to report to federal governments. I’m not a lawyer but I believe he was patently wrong on his understanding of both, and was basing his equivocation on a false understanding of what a president can do “with the stroke of a pen.”

Psycho Gecko
Guest
I find that a lot of anti-Hillary people don’t remember Dubya’s presidency very well. See, it all started when Florida went for Bush. He was certified as the winner with less than 1,000 more votes than Gore, in a state where Ralph Nader of the Green Party won more than 90,000 votes. As usual, when a Republican president takes office, you had things like preventing certain international aid groups we fund from providing condoms and sex education in places suffering from high rates of HIV and AIDS, and all the usual stuff you get from a GOP president. Then 9/11… Read more »
St. Ralph
Guest
That’s a very cogent recounting of the halcyon Bush years that now evoke almost as much nostalgia as Happy Days, but you left out the main driver and the very grease upon the wheels of our war-driven economy. While Bush and Rumsfeld and Powell and Rice were acting out the political Kabuki of “bringing freedom and democracy to the Middle East,” the Chaney/Rove administration, the one with the actual power, was diverting monumental sums of money to their cronies in the “defense” biz. Depending on which loosey-goosey intentionally unverifiable estimate you go with, the US dropped two to five trillion… Read more »
Psycho Gecko
Guest
Some of that money was simply wasted in idiotic rebuilding efforts overseen by young Republicans all picked because of their political ties. They were known as the Brat Pack, in charge of $13 billion, and with no experience in anything related to what they were doing. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A48543-2004May22.html Then there were the Provincial Reconstruction Teams, or PRTs, that wasted money on projects that didn’t help, like a chicken factory only used when they showed it off to visiting diplomats. Just a chicken factory for $2.5 million, but no logistics network, electricity, or refrigeration in most people’s homes. http://www.npr.org/2011/10/01/140974715/we-meant-well-an-attempt-of-sorts-to-rebuild-iraq And, as you… Read more »
Psycho Gecko
Guest

There’s gotta be a better way for me to comment episodes.